Why Is Physics More Connected With Religion Than Other Sciences?

0
438

Attempts to unite science and religion are not new. One of the most difficult aspects of this issue is the search for the same language by which parallels could be drawn, and physicists were most inclined to search for it.

The first scientist who linked science with religion

The first such physicist was Fridtjof Capra, and he was helped by psychedelics. When Capra wrote his work “The Tao of Physics” in 1975, publishers were skeptical about the connection between theoretical physics and oriental mysticism. However, the book became a bestseller, expanding the scope for discussing spirituality and science, bringing these discussions to a new level, although some critics still doubted even that Capra understood the quantum field theory.

The most suitable science for religion

And today it is physics that is the science that most often crosses spirituality and scientific data. Given the fact that there is no reason to believe that there is a human soul or an afterlife, at the chemical level there is no possibility of the existence of ethereal holy spirits, no neuroscientist will seriously consider the duality of the human being and no neurosurgeon will express the desire to discuss or questions paradise, the theoretical nature of physics is the ideal basis for the theoretical nature of religion.

Gates on the connection between science and religion

For example, you can take the physics theorist Sylvester James Gates, who began to study religion at the age of eleven when his mother died. He studied Christianity, Buddhism and other religions and mythologies, trying in detail to explore the wisdom of world beliefs. In 2013, Gates was awarded the Medal of Mendel for his work in the field of the union of science and religion.

In the course of his religious wanderings, he thought about science. At sixteen, at the physics class, Gates came to the revelation when he watched an experiment involving a stick, a board and a golf ball, in which continuity of space and time was demonstrated. “This is the only time in my life when I saw real magic,” Gates said. – For me, math is part of the imagination. It is that which exists somewhere between my ears. This is one of the applications, which I run in my head. When you see how mathematics manifests somewhere in the surrounding world, and not between the ears – it means that it exists in some deep sense around us. ”

Gates believes that both science and religion are necessary for the survival of mankind as a species, but he does not say where exactly these two aspects meet. To say that you think that there can be something more is not a scientific platform, but an ordinary curiosity.

The Dalai Lama and his teachings

Other scientists are trying to plunge a bit deeper into the question of the connection between science and religion. The Dalai Lama offers a much deeper understanding of this connection when he writes that science can be true only if there is empirical and reliable information that is not relevant to many other diverse human qualities: “Many aspects of reality, as well as many key elements of human existence , such as the ability to distinguish between good and evil, spirituality, creativity, that is, those things that are most valued in a person, inevitably fall out of the field of view of this method. ”

He refers to one Buddhist parable, which says that if someone points a finger at the moon, then you need not look at the tip of your finger. Scientific reductionism can not explain human emotions, even taking into account that, that a person is able to fully understand the biological mechanisms that result in emotions and consciousness.

However, the Dalai Lama does not come to the old, but erroneous conclusion that ethics depends entirely on religion. Buddhism has a long-standing connection with science, since this religion has the most solid theoretical bases – the Dalai Lama once said that if science proves the falsity of the Buddhist concept, this concept must be abandoned. However, it is extremely difficult to find such an approach in much more uncompromising religions, such as Christianity or Islam.

So if you are discussing the intercrossing of religion and science, it is very important to clarify which religion is involved. that ethics completely depends on religion. Buddhism has a long-standing connection with science, since this religion has the most solid theoretical bases – the Dalai Lama once said that if science proves the falsity of the Buddhist concept, this concept must be abandoned. However, it is extremely difficult to find such an approach in much more uncompromising religions, such as Christianity or Islam.

So if you are discussing the intercrossing of religion and science, it is very important to clarify which religion is involved that ethics completely depends on religion. Buddhism has a long-standing connection with science, since this religion has the most solid theoretical bases – the Dalai Lama once said that if science proves the falsity of the Buddhist concept, this concept must be abandoned. However, it is extremely difficult to find such an approach in much more uncompromising religions, such as Christianity or Islam.

So if you are discussing the intercrossing of religion and science, it is very important to clarify which religion is involved. such as Christianity or Islam. So if you are discussing the intercrossing of religion and science, it is very important to clarify which religion is involved. such as Christianity or Islam. So if you are discussing the intercrossing of religion and science, it is very important to clarify which religion is involved.

Rikar and Krishnamurati

And in this case Buddhism is most often chosen. Another monk, Mathieu Ricard, wrote the book together with Professor of Astronomy Chin Suan Tuan. Rikar studied molecular genetics and even defended his doctoral dissertation in 1972, but after that he indulged in meditation and contemplation. Like the Dalai Lama, Ricard recognizes the limitations of reductionism, while concentrating on higher emotional practices as a contrast.

All this ultimately leads to the well-known question of alchemical transformation: “Using the metaphor from ancient Buddhist texts, it can be said that only the warmth of compassion, combined with wisdom, can melt ore in human consciousness, thereby freeing the gold of human fundamental nature.” Krishnamurti expressed his thoughts on this matter in 1985 in a conversation with theoretical physicist David Bohm:

The diversity of science and religion

Each of these thinkers comes to similar conclusions: if by science is meant empirical materialism, evidence regarding human nature is wrong. This should not be confused, for example, with serious breakthroughs in neurochemistry. Both “science” and “religion” are broad terms, which have an impressive number of connotations.

The only difference is that science can be tested and confirmed by other scientists. And religion does not have such an impressive track record as science – at best it creates communities and unites disparate groups.

Conclusion

It is necessary to rejoice in any connection between science and religion, if it leads to the improvement of this world. Metaphysical speculation, which is based on some selective religious ideas, does not do any good, so they should not be taken seriously and confused with a scientific approach. 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here